Working In a Jewellers.

So I figured that after I have been linked to a blog for more recognition, I need to step my game up!

As Valentine’s day is fast approaching (could have sworn it was Christmas Day like yesterday?) I thought I’d share a little something with you all about a past job role and a bit about what I had to learn and things which might be useful for those of you who take Valentine’s seriously and go all out to tell/show your other halves how much you love them. Jewellery may seem like it’s overrated but after reading a few little things that I want to share with you, you’ll know why there’s such a craze for it.

At 16, my first ever job was a sales assistant at a jewellers called Ernest Jones. Some of you who aren’t from England might not have heard of Ernest Jones but it is owned by Signet who have stores all over the UK, US and Canada. The UK stores consist of H Samuels, who are Ernest Jones’ sister company, as well as Ernest Jones itself. The stores in the US are big names such as Kay Jewellers, Zales and so on. In Canada, they own Peoples Jewellers. This is something that I found fascinating when working for Ernest Jones.

So anyway, Ernest Jones was my first ever job and towards the end of my time there I realised that trying to juggle a-levels, my exams for them and learn about different aspects of my job was a bit too much to handle. So in April 2016, I handed in my notice after I’d gotten into a small spot of bother a couple of months beforehand.

Although my time there was just under 3 years, I had the most amazing insight into what it was all about. Despite working only one day a week, I discovered so much about something that I loved. Learning about metals, stones, watches.. the list goes on.

Something that I have always loved for the pure fact that it is so easy to look after is Sterling Silver. Hallmark as 925. Knowing that number will make it easier for you to differentiate between something that looks silver and something that is real silver. If you spot the number 925 on your piece of jewellery, you’re all good – you can take care of it with a simple Silver cleaning solution and you’re good to go. If it hasn’t got this number on it then chances are it’s one of these funny kinda deals that the more you wear it, it will start to go this funny copper-y colour and starts looking cheap! So keep an eye out for something that you buy from a shop that isn’t well-known or something that you receive as a gift. I know a great deal of people who are allergic to the things that start turning the orange colour so be careful!

I have a huge amount of Sterling Silver jewellery because, like many people, I prefer it over Gold.

So, Gold. There are so many different kinds of Gold out there – 9 carat, 18 carat, 14 carat, 22 carat and 24 carat. The american branded jewellery tend to use a lot of 24 carat gold with their products. For all those wondering what the word carat means, it is the weight of the gold. It can also be shortened to ‘ct’ – so if you spot on a label, something is ‘9ct’ it means 9 carat gold. There is also a thing called white gold. This is NOT natural. Again, for those of you who do not know – white gold is normal gold-plated with another metal called Rhodium. Once the plating starts wearing off, your item of jewellery will start to turn a champagne colour. This means it is time to take it to your local well-known jewellery shop to have it re-rhodium plated. This will do no harm to any stones that might be set in the jewellery. The goldsmiths will have a way of going about it without harming anything. As well as white gold, there is also rose gold. Again, this is not natural; it is regular gold mixed with copper to create the pink finish.

Other metals that I had to learn about whilst at Ernest Jones are Cobalt, Tungsten, Titanium *sings a little bit of the Sia song*, Platinum and Palladium. Cobalt and Tungsten are 2 very durable metals and I would often recommend these 2 metals to a gentleman buying his wedding band if he worked in an industrious job. A lot of builders, carpenters and such would often get pointed towards a wedding band made of either of these metals. Cobalt is a mixture of alloys which gives it a luxurious shine and Tungsten is 10 times harder than gold and is very scratch resistant. With Titanium, it is very similar in terms of its resistance to scratching. It is also strong. Platinum and Palladium are both hallmarked at 950 – to differentiate, the hallmark for Platinum will have a pentagon-shaped outline around the number whereas Palladium will have a speech-bubble shaped outline. A lot of celebrities will have Platinum wedding rings and other jewellery for its precious qualities, high luxuriousness and longevity.

Two of the brands that I loved to try on whilst working there are Le Vian and Neil Lane. Both American brands, each sit well with a long list of celebrities. Neil Lane, known for his bridal range, is very popular with the likes of Angelina Jolie and other such icons. Whilst Rihanna has been seen wearing a lot of Le Vian throughout her career, again amongst other famous people.

As far as Gemstones are concerned, the list is very long. My personal favourites; Diamonds (obviously), Morganite – this is a stone that has a very peachy pink tint, Aquamarine – a stone with a very pale blue tint but can also be a vibrant blue and Cubic Zirconia which is the man-made equivalent to a Diamond and is found in a large amount of Sterling Silver jewellery as a cheaper alternative to the classic Silver and Diamond jewellery.

Diamonds are bloody amazing, excuse the language. Something else to know is that if you are buying a ring, for arguements sake, and the ring has lots of diamonds on it and the label/description/certificate says it is 0.25ct; this means that all the stones put together are a quarter of a carat of Diamond. If all the stones put together are 1ct, it means that the combined weight of the Diamonds are 1 carat. Also, you will hear the word ‘included’ a few times when shopping around for diamonds. Nothing to worry about, all it is is just if you look at a diamond underneath a magnified loupe, if it has any black dot-like birthmarks within it that means that the diamond hasn’t got a high clarity. Just from a picture I got from google, this is something you will need to study if you want to take wedding band/ring shopping seriously. Also look into colour and cut! There are 4 C’s – Carat, Clarity, Cut and Colour.

engagement-ring-clarity-chart_4

So, all you ladies out there can sit down with your partners and show them what you have learnt from this blog and do some further research before purchasing a special gift, engagement or wedding ring or just because it is useful to know the different aspects of something that is so classic – jewellery.

There is a lot more to learn and discover about jewellery but I thought I’d share a few snip-bits of the things I already know and enlighten some of you about it if you’re someone who is getting married soon and haven’t spoken directly to a jeweller or you’re someone who is buying a special gift and now knows some extra bits of information!

I cannot tell you the amount of guys I had in around Valentine’s day, melting my heart about how they were going to propose on the day and do this and that to make it special. So… for all you guys out there that have just read my blog, you can chill out now. You know the ins and outs of the weights of Diamonds, you know your metals, you know about 2 very gorgeous brands (seriously, research Le Vian and Niel Lane). It’s going to be fine, she’ll love what you pick out because it is the fact that YOU’VE picked it that will matter the most to her. Worst comes to worse, you can go together to a jeweller so she can pick out some rings that she likes and then you go back a little while later to pick on of the ideas she showed you, in the right size, and that way everyone’s a winner! Winner winner chicken dinner.

All my love, as always

M x

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